Fisheries & Conservation Science Group

Staff

Prof. Michel Kaiser

Prof. Michel Kaiser

After completing a PhD at Bangor University I worked for CEFAS for eight years and since then have continued to develop my research interests in understanding how fishing affects marine ecosystems and how we can better manage our use of natural resources. To achieve this I have examined the efficacy of using Marine Protected Areas as management tools, the socio-economic impact of different approaches to fisheries management, and the development of an evidence-based approach to conservation. More recently I have been engaged in fishermen-scientist workshops to encourage dialogue and learning. Public duties include an appointment to the board of the Seafish Industry Authority and also to the board of the Joint Nature Conservation Committee. I have published over 135 peer reviewed papers and have authored or edited 5 books and write articles for the popular press.

Dr Jan Geert Hiddink

Dr Jan Geert Hiddink

After completing a PhD at Groningen University in the Netherlands, I started research on the effect of fishing and climate change on bottom ecosystems at Bangor University in 2002. My research combines ecological modelling, ship-based research and the analyses of long-term data sets to assess and predict the effect of disturbances on the functioning of marine ecosystems. This work has provided assessments of the effect of towed bottom trawls on the functioning of benthic ecosystems, and evaluations of the effects of marine protected areas, and the associated redistribution of fishing effort. I have published over 48 peer reviewed papers and one undergraduate textbook.

Dr Lewis LeVay

Dr Lewis LeVay

Director of the Centre for Applied Marine Sciences, with a background in aquaculture and fisheries across a wide range of temperate and tropical environments, focused mainly on shellfish.  Recent research has focused on ecosystem services provided by coastal habitats, crustacean fisheries, environmental sustainability of aquaculture in coastal wetlands and wastewater remediation. Extensive experience of hatchery technology, feeds and nutrition and development of stock enhancement strategies comparing hatchery and habitat management based approaches.

Dr Ian McCarthy

Dr Ian McCarthy

After a BSc in Marine Biology/Zoology at Bangor, a PhD at Aberdeen and 9 years postdoctoral research in Aberdeen, Glasgow and Texas, I returned to Bangor to take up a lectureship in Fish Biology in 2002. My main area of research is animal ecophysiology looking at how animals adapt to varying environments and individual differences in growth and performance. However, in addition I am involved in fisheries-related research looking at fisheries ecology of commercially important species in UK waters (e.g. plaice, sea bass, rays) and have also been involved in similar studies in the Arabian Gulf (e.g. sparids, lethrinids and haemulids). I am interested in the use of chemical tags (elements and isotopes) to look at origins and movement patterns of freshwater (e.g brown trout) and marine fishes (e.g. sea trout and sea bass). I have published 62 peer-reviewed papers.

Isobel Bloor

Dr Isobel Bloor

After graduating from Queen Mary’s University of London with an MSc in Marine Ecology and Environmental management, I worked as a marine ecologist at a small independent marine consultancy managing the impacts of marine related projects. I then worked on a 3 year cross-Channel EU project on cephalopod ecology and completed my PhD in conjunction with the Marine Biological Association and the Marine Institute, University of Plymouth on Cephalopod ecology, movement and behaviour, undertaking the first electronic tagging field study of the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) in the field. My research has been predominately fisheries and field-work based working directly with inshore potting fishermen, undertaking acoustic and data storage tagging studies and completing in situ scuba surveys of spawning grounds. I also have experience in developing presence-only and presence-absence species distribution models. My current role as a postdoctoral fisheries scientist on the Isle of Man involves developing and undertaking stock assessments and providing the science necessary to assist the government in managing the scallop, lobster and crab fisheries within the territorial sea.

Giulia Cambiè

Dr Giulia Cambiè

I graduated in Environmental Sciences (marine-biological area) from the University Carsquo; Foscari di Venezia (Italy) in 2004. After this I gained a scholarship at the Hellenic Center for Marine Research (Athens, Greece), working in a national project on trammel net selectivity (IMAS-FISH). In 2008 I gained a Master of Science in “Fisheries Economics and Management” at the University of Barcelona (Spain) and in the same year I obtained a research contract at the University of A Coruña (Spain) on studying the small-scale fisheries in Galicia. Since 2007 I have also collaborated with the University of Calabria (Italy) on assessing the impact of longline fisheries on sea turtles, which became my PhD thesis project. In 2012 I joined the Fisheries and Conservation Science Group as a Postdoctoral Fisheries Scientist. I am responsible for leading the development of the sampling programme, data integration, analysis and modeling necessary to advise the industry and Government on the different management scenarios to achieve sustainable use of finfish resources in Welsh waters.

Jack Emmerson

Jack Emmerson

I am a fisheries scientist focusing principally on the interaction between commercial static-gear fisheries in the Irish Sea and the biology of the shellfish resources they depend upon. I gained my BSc and MSc degrees at York University and have worked as a shellfish research scientist for the Holderness Fishing Industry Group, Orkney Sustainable Fisheries and the Cardigan Bay Fisherman’s Society. I am part of the Fisheries and Conservation Science group at Bangor University and am based on the Isle of Man within the Department for Environment, Food & Agriculture. I am leading on research related to the biology and life-history of lobster (H. gammarus), edible crab (C. pagurus) and whelk (B. undatum) and am contracted to supply evidence to inform sustainable management of static-gear fisheries within the Isle of Man territorial waters, whilst working towards a part-time PhD “Sustainable static-gear fisheries in the Irish Sea”.

Dr Natalie Hold

Dr Natalie Hold

I have worked on the reproductive ecology and population genetics of lobsters and scallops for the last 5 years. I am interested in how the various reproductive strategies of marine species interact with different management strategies to produce varying levels of management success. Understanding how reproductive behaviour and success will be influenced by the implementation of management interventions is essential for ensuring that stocks can continue to reproduce sufficiently for a sustainable fishery. I will be using genetic methods to study both the reproductive strategies and the connectivity between populations of various commercial Welsh species. I will also be working closely with the lobster potting industry, collecting data for a stock assessment to ensure a sustainable lobster fishery in Wales.

Kathryn Hughes

Kathryn Hughes

Kath’s research focus considers characterising ecological and anthropogenic drivers of the distributions of fish populations, and attempts to disentangle one from the other using multivariate statistical and modelling methods. Of particular focus is the use of varying spatial scales to elucidate sound ecological patterns in pelagic and groundfish population distribution/relative abundance and potential mechanisms of change in time and space. Kath has joined Bangor University as a Postdoctoral Researcher and is currently conducting a global systematic review and meta-analysis into the impacts of mobile bottom fishing on marine benthic biota and secondly using fishing effort data to determine a global footprint of fishing effort in space and time.

Claire Szostek

Dr Claire Szostek

I gained an MSc in Marine Environmental Protection at Bangor University in 2011 and completed a PhD in 2015. My PhD research focused on the king scallop fishery in the English Channel (worth >£60 million per annum) and was funded by the UK scallop fishing industry. I assessed the geographic extent of inshore and offshore scallop fishing and the related habitat impacts. Genetic analysis revealed connectivity between scallop stocks across the English Channel and I completed a full spatial assessment of fishery bycatch. I am currently working on developing the Seafish RASS (Risk Assessment for Sourcing Seafood) tool that provides information and evidence to inform businesses in their sourcing of sustainable seafood. The most up-to-date data on the impacts of fishing gears in specific seabed habitats will be analysed and used to enhance our predictions of fishing gear impacts and enable evaluation of the benefits of gear modifications. Such information is necessary for the management of fishing activities around our coast, in particular for areas of conservation importance such as protected areas or Marine Conservation Zones.

Graham Monkman

Graham George Monkman

Initially graduating in biotechnology from Leeds University in 1994, I moved into computing after my degree, eventually taking the role of quality director for a software house. The company primarily specialised in project and asset management SaaS solutions delivered to UK businesses and local authorities. My range of expertise within my 20 years+ in the software sector would make a very long and very dull list, but included full life cycle management of business critical projects with individual values in excess of £100k

In 2013 I undertook an MSc in Marine Biology at Bangor University and was awarded the Jeremy Jones Memorial Prize for outstanding achievement. After the MSc I gained a PhD studentship from the FSBI with the broad remit of investigating new and novel technical solutions to delivering effective and cost efficient assessments of recreational fisheries. Such methods have applications beyond recreational fisheries; image recognition, natural language process and citizen science have applications to commercial marine fisheries monitoring and wider ecosystems assessment worldwide.

Jenny Shepperson

Jenny Shepperson

I obtained a BSc in Ecology from Cardiff University, followed by a MSc in Geographic Information Systems from the University of Ulster. During my Masters, I investigated the reliability of fisher local knowledge collected in the Isle of Man. This, and experience working in an artisanal fishery in Greece, led me to begin a PhD with Bangor University and CEFAS. My project is titled “The Development of a Spatially Dynamic Fishery Model to Engage Fishermen in Management Strategy Evaluation”, and is centred on the need to better understand the spatial and temporal displacement of effort following management. The development of tools to better understand this displacement of effort following management actions could increase the confidence in and efficacy of management. The aim of this project is to develop a predictive model capable of forecasting the behaviour of scallop fishing vessels in relation to changing environmental and economic conditions, and the consequences of this for the fishery’s sustainability. A simulation model with a user interface that fishermen, managers, and scientists can use to explore the fishery dynamics will be a key output of the project. ​ The central ​theme is finding the most appropriate course of action considering both economic and ecological sustainability.

Prof. Michel Kaiser

Prof. Michel Kaiser

After completing a PhD at Bangor University I worked for CEFAS for eight years and since then have continued to develop my research interests in understanding how fishing affects marine ecosystems and how we can better manage our use of natural resources. To achieve this I have examined the efficacy of using Marine Protected Areas as management tools, the socio-economic impact of different approaches to fisheries management, and the development of an evidence-based approach to conservation. More recently I have been engaged in fishermen-scientist workshops to encourage dialogue and learning. Public duties include an appointment to the board of the Seafish Industry Authority and also to the board of the Joint Nature Conservation Committee. I have published over 135 peer reviewed papers and have authored or edited 5 books and write articles for the popular press.

Isobel Bloor

Dr Isobel Bloor

After graduating from Queen Mary’s University of London with an MSc in Marine Ecology and Environmental management, I worked as a marine ecologist at a small independent marine consultancy managing the impacts of marine related projects. I then worked on a 3 year cross-Channel EU project on cephalopod ecology and completed my PhD in conjunction with the Marine Biological Association and the Marine Institute, University of Plymouth on Cephalopod ecology, movement and behaviour, undertaking the first electronic tagging field study of the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) in the field. My research has been predominately fisheries and field-work based working directly with inshore potting fishermen, undertaking acoustic and data storage tagging studies and completing in situ scuba surveys of spawning grounds. I also have experience in developing presence-only and presence-absence species distribution models. My current role as a postdoctoral fisheries scientist on the Isle of Man involves developing and undertaking stock assessments and providing the science necessary to assist the government in managing the scallop, lobster and crab fisheries within the territorial sea.

Jack Emmerson

Jack Emmerson

I am a fisheries scientist focusing principally on the interaction between commercial static-gear fisheries in the Irish Sea and the biology of the shellfish resources they depend upon. I gained my BSc and MSc degrees at York University and have worked as a shellfish research scientist for the Holderness Fishing Industry Group, Orkney Sustainable Fisheries and the Cardigan Bay Fisherman’s Society. I am part of the Fisheries and Conservation Science group at Bangor University and am based on the Isle of Man within the Department for Environment, Food & Agriculture. I am leading on research related to the biology and life-history of lobster (H. gammarus), edible crab (C. pagurus) and whelk (B. undatum) and am contracted to supply evidence to inform sustainable management of static-gear fisheries within the Isle of Man territorial waters, whilst working towards a part-time PhD “Sustainable static-gear fisheries in the Irish Sea”.

Jenny Shepperson

Jenny Shepperson

I obtained a BSc in Ecology from Cardiff University, followed by a MSc in Geographic Information Systems from the University of Ulster. During my Masters, I investigated the reliability of fisher local knowledge collected in the Isle of Man. This, and experience working in an artisanal fishery in Greece, led me to begin a PhD with Bangor University and CEFAS. My project is titled “The Development of a Spatially Dynamic Fishery Model to Engage Fishermen in Management Strategy Evaluation”, and is centred on the need to better understand the spatial and temporal displacement of effort following management. The development of tools to better understand this displacement of effort following management actions could increase the confidence in and efficacy of management. The aim of this project is to develop a predictive model capable of forecasting the behaviour of scallop fishing vessels in relation to changing environmental and economic conditions, and the consequences of this for the fishery’s sustainability. A simulation model with a user interface that fishermen, managers, and scientists can use to explore the fishery dynamics will be a key output of the project. ​ The central ​theme is finding the most appropriate course of action considering both economic and ecological sustainability.

Sam Dignan

Sam Dignan

I attained a Bachelor of Science (Honours) degree in Biological and Chemical Sciences with Zoology from University College Cork (UCC) in Cork, Ireland in 2011. I focused my studies on marine biology and field studies, with my final year dissertation being titled: “Abundance and Distribution of Anomia ephippium in Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve, Ireland.” Following graduation I worked for a year saving for my return to education at Bangor University in 2012, where I studied for a Masters in Marine Environmental Protection. I have always been interested in fisheries and my thesis titled: “Quantifying Catch Depletion Rates in the Isle of Man Queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) fishery” intensified my interest in the area of fisheries management. My thesis also led to an understanding of the forward thinking management of the Isle of Man scallop fishery and I subsequently came to work here, as part of the fisheries group from Bangor University, supplying advice to the Manx government.

I am currently hoping to pursue a PhD through published works, the title of which has yet to be decided.

Dr Jodie Haig

Dr Jodie Haig

I am a marine ecologist interested in invertebrate biology and ecology. My honours research investigated the reproductive strategies of a brooding featherstar species endemic to southern Australian waters (University of Adelaide, South Australia). My PhD addressed the broader topic of connectivity among crustaceans in seagrass habitats by combining molecular and ecological approaches to assess habitat use, larval dispersal, cryptic diversity and genetic connectivity (gene flow) for inshore seagrass fauna (Griffith University, Queensland). Recently I have worked as a marine consultant on a variety of industry and research projects around Australia. I now have the exciting opportunity to work with a team of globally respected fisheries scientists at the School of Ocean Sciences. I will be working in collaboration with the Welsh fishing industry, Government and the Countryside Council for Wales to develop science and monitoring necessary to assist in the sustainable management of crustacean and whelk fisheries in local waters.

Dr Lee Murray

Dr Hilmar Hinz

I graduated in Marine Biology from Newcastle in 1994. I further undertook a Masters Degree in Biology at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) and worked on several national and EU funded research projects for the Senckenberg Institute (Wilhelmshaven, Germany). In 2001 I joined the Coastal Resource Ecology and Management group led by Dr. M.J. Kaiser at the School of Ocean Sciences working on Essential Fish Habitats. In 2005 I completed a part-time PhD on the habitat use of flatfishes. I further worked on the effects of fishing disturbance on benthic communities within the framework of two European projects: COST-IMPACT and RESPONSE. In 2006 I worked for a period of 18 month at the Marine Biological Association on benthic communities in the English Channel. Subsequently I returned to Bangor University investigated the effects of marine reserves on the recovery of benthic invertebrates in Lyme Bay. Between 2009–2013 I have been working to provide scientific evidence to the Isle of Man and Welsh Governments to increase the long term sustainability of their fisheries. I recently have been awarded a Marie Curie Fellowship and I am now investigating the trophic links between coastal algal beds and fish in the Mediterranean at the IEO in Palma de Mallorca (Spain). I hold an honorary lectureship at Bangor University and I am actively collaborating in research and teaching at the School of Ocean Sciences.

Dr Gwladys Lambert

Dr Gwladys Lambert

I am a researcher in fisheries sciences. I have studied in France, Denmark and Wales, always focusing on the understanding of marine ecosystems and the management of the seas resources. My interest in this field came naturally after growing up in a family of fishermen, in Brittany, France. My grandfather was part of the first generation of mussel farmers there and we have always lived by the sea, depending on the food it provided. My job now is to investigate how the Welsh scallop fishery can be sustainably managed by providing scientific expertise and collaborating with the fishing industry.

Dr Lee Murray

Dr Lee Murray

I am a fisheries ecologist and project manager of the ‘Sustainable use of fisheries resources in Welsh waters’ EFF project and the Isle of Man fisheries and conservation project. My research has examined the impact of crab predation on commercial mussel cultivation working with the fishing industry in Wales and Maine, USA. More recently I have undertaken fisheries research for the Isle of Man providing the science necessary to obtain Marine Stewardship Council certification of the Isle of Man queen scallop fishery and implement effective fisheries management, principally concerning scallop fisheries. I am the scientific advisor to the Isle of Man queen scallop management board, and I have also worked as a fisheries assessor for a certification body scoring a scallop fishery against MSC principles. I am currently working on stock assessments for king and queen scallops and I am particularly interested in using fishing industry data to help achieve industry-led management of fisheries.

Google Scholar profile

Fikret Ondes

Fikret Ondes

I graduated from Ege University (Turkey), Faculty of Fisheries in 2009. In 2011, I completed an MSc in Marine-Inland Water Sciences and Technology Department at Ege University. In my MSc thesis I studied population dynamics of tanaid (Tanaidacea, Crustacea) species on hard substrates in İzmir Bay. Moreover, I participated in some research projects related to benthic ecology and coastal fisheries management in Turkey. I then started a PhD in 2011 at Bangor University. My PhD thesis topic is “Ecology of the brown crab (Cancer pagurus) in the Isle of Man to inform sustainable management”. I am currently working on population assessment, nursery areas, issues of bycatch, shell disease and population movements and demographics. The PhD project will help to understand sustainable use of the brown crab stocks.

Julia Pantin

Julia Pantin

I attained a Bachelor of Science (Honours) degree in biology from Memorial University in St. John’s, Newfoundland in 2009. I focused my studies on marine biology and field studies and completed a dissertation titled ‘Lobster Abundance and Egg Production in Relation to Substrate Rugosity in Bonne Bay, Newfoundland.’ After completing this BSc. (Honours), I worked as a Science Technician and Aquarist at the Ocean Sciences Centre in Newfoundland. Through this position I contributed to ongoing research and husbandry of captive harp seals and served as aquarist to the research facility. In 2011, I completed a Master’s of Science (Distinction) in Marine Biology at Bangor University. My thesis research on the indirect effects of trawling disturbance of the condition of European plaice in the eastern Irish Sea, allowed me to extend my research interests in fisheries ecology and conservation and further develop my field skills both on and offshore. Upon completing my MSc, I undertook an internship with the Conservation Corps of Newfoundland and developed and executed a community-based coastal resource inventory for three rural towns.

Georgia Robson

Georgia Robson

I attained a Marine and Freshwater Biology BSc (Hons) from Aberystwyth University, and a Marine Biology MSc from Bangor University. My MSc research project assessed the distribution and abundance of the common whelk in South Wales, working on board commercial fishing vessels. I am currently a research support officer based in Aberystwyth, working for the Fisheries and Conservation Science group and Cardigan Bay Fishermen’s Association (CBFA), to assess the sustainable management of the Cardigan Bay prawn fishery.

Niamh Ryan

Niamh Ryan

I obtained my undergraduate degree from University College Dublin before attaining my MSc in Marine Biology at Bangor University. My research focused on the variations in size at maturity in the European lobster fishery of Wales. This involved working alongside fishermen on board commercial fishing vessels collecting data and samples. I am currently a research support officer for the Fisheries and Conservation group in collaboration with the Cardigan Bay Fishermen’s Association (CBFA), based in Aberystwyth. I am working on the sustainable management of the Cardigan Bay prawn fishery.

Harriet Salomonsen

Harriet Salomonsen

I studied first in Scotland and later at Bangor University where I gained my Master’s degree. My research focused on the impacts of noise from wind farm construction on fish behaviour, in collaboration with CEFAS. I have worked in Australia and Oman as a research assistant assessing fish population dynamics and investigating coral reef management tools. I have worked as a marine ecologist for consultancy carrying out fisheries surveys for the assessment of marine habitats for the power industry. Most recently I worked as a benthic taxonomist. I am a now a research assistant for this international team of fisheries scientists at Bangor University. I will be involved in all aspects of the project to help provide the science necessary to guide management plans for the sustainable use of Welsh fisheries.

Anwen Williams

Anwen Williams

Senior clerical officer. Finance and admininistration for the project. Primary point of contact for all general enquiries.

Kayla Williams

Kayla Williams

I attained my Bachelor’s degree in Zoology at Aberystwyth University, before gaining my Master’s degree in Marine Biology at Bangor University. During my MSc I researched the growth and moulting of the European lobster in Wales in collaboration with the Fisheries and Conservation Science team. I now work as a Research Project Support Officer with the team researching the “Sustainable management of the Cardigan Bay prawn fishery” with the Cardigan Bay Fisherman’s Association (CBFA). Based in Aberystwyth.